This article appeared in print as part of “Remote Control”

 

You’ve heard of co-working, but what is it exactly? And is it for you?

A co-working space is a shared office environment available for rent. It’s often an open floor plan area where freelancers, remote workers, or entrepreneurs can rent a desk or office for work and be surrounded by others in similar working scenarios.

Often, space can be rented for full- or part-time increments, and the myriad industries and individuals represented allows for networking and shared skills.

It’s an opportunity to work in a professional environment without the responsibilities of maintaining and paying for a full-time office. It allows more privacy than working from a coffee shop and more professionalism than working from home. Oftentimes, co-working spaces offer a collaborative and social environment, which can be beneficial for those who work alone.

At The Hatchery, a co-working space in Columbia, founder Amanda Quick says most of her clients are “solo-preneurs,” many who worked from home and find themselves to be more productive when they have an office to go to (and a reason to get out of their sweatpants). She also has remote workers utilize her space.

Though a well-known concept on the coasts, co-working spaces are still a bit of an unknown in Columbia. “We’re having to do a lot of education on what it is and how people can benefit and showing there really is a better way than working from home by yourself,” Quick says.

 

What makes a good co-working space?

Amber Monaco is a founding member of The Hatchery, and she’s spent the last two years traveling full time and running her creative content marketing business. She’s worked in over 40 co-working spaces across the globe and spends time with her sister, who lives in Ashland. Here, she gives us some factors that can make or break a co-working space.

  • Events where members of the space can get together for skill shares or accountability or even a happy hour. Being a solo-preneur can be lonely. It’s office bonding, without the office politics.
  • Private options. Most co-working spaces are open floor, which leads to discussions and sharing ideas. But private rooms you can jump into for sensitive client calls or Skype sessions are key.
  • Good light. It might sound silly, but good, natural lighting can boost mood and energy, and it creates an inviting space where you would want to go to work.

Recent News

An Economical Resource for Church Leaders

When Dr. Rod Casey, director of the Theological Education Initiative (TEI), first came to Columbia, he quickly fell in love with the trail systems,...

Construction Underway for Bike Boulevard

Cyclists will soon have an easier way to reach the MKT trail from the Business Loop. You may have noticed construction on some of...

EnCircle Technologies Merges With Woodhaven

EnCircle Technologies is celebrating their fifth anniversary and looking at plans for a merger.  *Editor’s Note: Woodhaven announced a merger with EnCircle Technologies on...

SEED Success Fights Poverty One Student at a Time

Columbia Public Schools and a fledgling not-for-profit called SEED Success partnered up in May to test out a new pilot program at a few...

A Magnet for Students Driven to Excel

An overview of MU’s Army ROTC program. Land-grant institutions like MU once required all students to study military science. Today, the Reserve Officers’ Training...