• Remember that the showcase is during a business day. If you have a small staff, make a schedule in advance of who will be at the booth and who will staff the store. Schedule shifts to rotate staff so everyone has the opportunity to experience the showcase.
  • It’s easy to overestimate the size of your booth. Before the showcase, use masking tape to draw out the dimensions of your booth to help plan your configuration. This will help you avoid bringing too many displays or products that will overwhelm visitors – and create more work during set-up and tear-down.
  • Be respectful of people who take a glance at your booth and keep moving. Jumping out at passersby and forcing them to engage leaves a bad impression.
  • Make a list of people you want to meet, and try to network with them during the quarterly membership breakfast or luncheon. If there are booths you want to see, check them out when you feel a lull in activity so you’re not away from your booth during peak times.
  • Unless active social media is a part of your booth’s activity, put your cell phone away. Every time you’re checking email or Facebook, you’re missing an opportunity to engage with a visitor.
  • Go large, bold, colorful and easy-to-read on signage and banners. Avoid lots of text.

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